All About Coffee Ground

Is there such a thing as truly useless refuse? I would think not, particularly in light of the wealth of information on how to reuse things of little value. Things that most people undervalue, for example, glass, lumber, wood pulp, paper, used rubber tires, and in the scope of this article. I guess it truly is a case of one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. As it turns out, this treasure, in this case, used coffee grounds, can be put to more than one use, in fact, I can list 15 uses right now.

1. Insect control
Insect control – There is currently an online meme going around that spraying used coffee grounds on your plants and skin will repel mosquitoes, particularly ones that carry Zika Virus. There is in fact no scientific literature to demonstrate this, although there is some evidence research-wise that spraying coffee and used coffee grounds on mosquito breeding sites inhibited the embryogenesis of mosquito larvae, and thus significantly reduced the number of mosquito larvae that successfully matured into adults.

2. Fertilizer
For plants that like acidic soil, such as hydrangeas, rhododendrons, camellias, roses, blueberries, magnolia trees, etc. Used coffee ground can serve as a source of excellent fertilizer. Some flowers will even change colors depending on the pH level of the surrounding soil, so put the blue in your hydrangea bloom, with used coffee grounds!

3. Carrots and radish growth
Carrots and radishes work great with used coffee grounds. Sprinkling the latter onto the former before planting will help the little seedlings grow faster and provide an extra boost when they are just germinating, you are sure to reap bigger produce as a result. A literal example of reaping what you sow!

4. Growing your own mushrooms
Do you like to eat mushrooms? They can be quite the delicacy. Certain types of mushrooms are amenable to being grown in containers filled with used coffee grounds. For example, the pearl oyster mushrooms. Grow your own ‘shrooms today and become a spore farmer!

5. Clean your fireplace
Clean your fireplace. Adding some damp coffee grounds to your fireplace will enable you to sweep all the ash away without creating a billowing cloud of dust.

6. Deodorize your fridge
Does your fridge smell like a garbage dump? Use it to keep it smelling fresh and pristine. Works even better than baking soda.

7. Pet anti-flea bath
Add some coffee grounds to your dog or cat’s shampoo to deliver a flea repellent flea bath.

8. Strip hair buildup
Adding some to your shampoo or conditioner can strip oil and other buildup from your hair.

9. Remove eye bags
It can help you in other ways in the mornings too. In this case they can be used to reduce the dark circles under your eyes.

10. “Salting” the street
Caught in a snow storm? Reduce your chances of getting snowed in by using coffee grounds to “salt” the roads and sidewalks. Used coffee grounds make for great gravel and the acidic content helps to burns through the ice faster.

11. Make garbage disposal cleaners
Did you know you can make garbage disposal cleaners using it? You can make them using just the coffee grounds, epsom salt, baking soda, a little vinegar, and maybe a little vanilla.

12. Unclogging your drain
It can also be used to unclog your drain. All that’s needed is boiling water, a little dish soap, and the used coffee grounds. Just 3 drops of dish soap, a pot of boiling water, and the grounds will cleanse the drain of grease and clogs.

13. Get rid of odors
It can be used to get rid of odors after chopping up foul smelling things. Just rub them on your hands and wash afterwards. The grounds will neutralize the odor.

14. Pan cleaning
Do you have caked-on dirt on your pans? If so, some coffee grounds sprinkled on a rag will remove them easily, just don’t use it on ceramic dishes and other types that stain easily.

15. Air freshener creation
l Have you ever wanted an air freshener that smells like coffee beans? Just double up a pair of lady’s stockings with some used coffee ground inside of it and tie off, and voila! A coffee air freshener, who knew innovation could be so easy?

Facts About Rice In Clay Pots

There are several advantages of cooking rice in a clay pot. If you have tried it, you must already be aware of most of these. For instance, rice cooks soft, fluffy and each grain separate from one another in a clay pot – without using any oils or additives. On the other hand, while cooking rice in conventional pots, they mostly turn out to be mushy and taste quite bland. But the important thing is – what happens to the carbohydrates? Let’s find out…

Types of Carbohydrates in Rice

Rice contains simple and complex carbohydrates. The body needs a balance of both for optimal management of insulin – a naturally produced hormone that controls sugar levels in the blood. Simple carbs break quickly and release glucose, but complex carbs burn and release energy slowly.

Rice Cooked in Conventional Cookware

Complex carbs, the slow-burning kind- are also delicate and subject to damage with harsh heat. The problem with metals and ceramic cookware is that they give out harsh near-infrared heat. It is evident from the fact that touching a hot metal/ceramic pot burns your fingers. It does something similar to the delicate complex carbs. As a result, the cooked rice is left with only simple carbs and starch. When you keep eating such depleted grains regularly, the body rushes to produce insulin to break down simple carbs into energy. There is a constant high demand for insulin coupled with a deficiency of complex carbs – the body finally fails to produce enough insulin. The excessive glucose in the blood causes Type 2 diabetes.

Also, rice cooked in metals and ceramics become toxic from what leaches from these cookware – they weaken your immune system.

Rice Cooked in a Pure Clay Pot

When you cook rice in pure clay pots, it not only cooks fluffy and better tasting, the nutrients are saved as well. Thanks to food-friendly far-infrared heat from pure-clay, the simple carbs, and the more delicate complex carbs stay intact. A balanced proportion of these two keeps body functions healthy and its ability to produce insulin slowly improves again!

When you keep providing your body a balanced diet, the insulin levels are well-managed once again and THIS HEALS DIABETES! – It may sound unbelievable but it’s true, based on real-life experiences of people. When you switch to clay cookware permanently, you start feeling healthier with high energy levels (thanks to complex carbs) and better immunity (because no more metal toxins)!

It’s never too late to make a change for your family’s health!

Tips To Make Butter

The basic design consists of a base that house the motor bowl that fits around the shaft and disks that perform the desired tasks. Most all modern units have safety features built-in to make sure all the attachments are in the proper alignment. Although most of today’s food processors are powered by electric and some still function by manually operating the cutting blades.

Food processors are an appliance that can perform many functions and take the drudgery out of the preparation process. They can also be one of the most expensive additions to your countertop appliances. Consider your counter-space and ease of cleaning when searching for the right model for your cooking and preparation needs.

If you already have one and haven’t used it for a while, try making your own butter and buttermilk.

Here is a way you can make your own butter in roughly two minutes.

Step 1

Warm one pint of heavy cream and a 1/4 tsp of salt to room temperature.

Step 2

Prepare the food processor and wash and dry the bowl and blades before you begin.

Step 3

Place the heavy cream in the bowl of the processor. Now is the time to add ingredients if you want your butter fancy such as garlic, parsley or spices to suit your taste.

Warning: Do not overfill your bowl or it will spill out during churning.

Step 4

Turn the processor to churn the heavy cream at low-speed. Watch the cream solids separate and congeal to butter. It should take no longer than two or three minutes. the cream will go through stages usually indicated by changes in the sound coming from the food processor bowl. First it turns very creamy and looks like ice-cream. The churning noise will become rougher and cream will abruptly turn solid when the butter separates from the buttermilk. Stop the processor and if it taste like butter, you’re done. If it still tastes like cream run it another one to two minutes.

Step 5

Drain the buttermilk, the liquid that remains after the butter congeals is fresh buttermilk that may be used in many recipes that calls for it.

Step 6

Squeeze any remaining buttermilk from the butter. Wash hands thoroughly. Fold a large piece of cheese cloth in half and place the butter in the middle and fold sides up into a bag. While holding the closed end of the bag with one hand, knead and squeeze the butter to force out any remaining buttermilk. This step is very important. If you don’t remove as much of the buttermilk as you can the butter may turn rancid in a day or two.

Step 7

Place the butter into a container, a bowl or square mold will do. Press it down with a large spoon or spatula. This may cause more liquid to come out of the butter. Drain the liquid before storing.

Step 8

Cool in the refrigerator. The butter will be immediately ready to use, but with dairy products it must be refrigerated when not in use.

Ideas For Leftovers Food

Most recipes are geared to servings for 6 or so, and for those who have less than that, or have picky kids, leftovers are an issue. What do you do with the leftovers? Persnickety won’t eat them. Make it into something that you like, something you can recycle! The Persnicketys of the world do not like leftovers. They must be disguised, and the best way is to plan your menu.

-Don’t have stew the first night of the week, have tacos. The next day it could become taco soup with leftover corn, canned tomato, chopped onions. Cooked shrimp becomes shrimp scampi the next night, and if that does not do it, make a shrimp stew with cream of potato and cream of shrimp, along with some half and half, garlic, and red pepper.

-Leftover corn, green beans, noodles, squash? Vegetable soup. Keep some chicken stock around, and stock your kitchen with basics like cream of mushroom and chopped or diced tomato. The noodles can become soup with carrots and celery or another noodle salad with your excess meat leftovers. The raw carrots become sauted carrots and later boiled carrots and then salad. The roasted vegetables can be lunch the next day!

-If you prepare twice the amount of noodles or veggies, you can make soup or pasta later in the week. Extra rice? make pudding, breads, meatballs. Anticipate barbecue and sandwiches out of pot roast.

-Make sure you store leftovers well. Glass is best-nothing leaks into your food and you can see through it. Use sandwich bags and freezer bags! Label and date, always, or you end up with frozen lumps of mystery. Take the challenge to eat leftovers at least once a week.

-Do you pack a lunch for yourself, the spouse, or the kids? Turn dinner into lunch. Its a way to eat healthy all week, and eat well. Cheese crackers be gone! Sour cream, salsa, and shredded cheese can solve, hide, or transform many leftovers.

-Make vegetable soup or stew from those vegetables that were a side dish. Keep your vegetable scraps! A very easy and simple way is to puree with broth or half and half. Voila! Add croutons or shredded cheese and you have an instant meal. Another way to use those scraps it to add to a freezer bag, and keep adding. When the bag is full, dump it in a pot. Instant soup, just add broth and diced tomato. Alternatively, you can boil in broth and strain for vegetable stock.

-Stale bread becomes french toast, croutons, stuffing, or bread to dip in a herbed olive oil.

-You can always add those scraps to lettuce and make a salad with your favorite dressing.

Everything has a solution and can become something new-it just takes a little thought and organization.

Tips To Make Yogurt At Home

How to make yogurt at home? But not just any yogurt, how to make delicious, thick and creamy yogurt right in your kitchen? This question can tempt your taste buds any time but the process of making it might seem daunting, a lot of times. Some of the common problems are yogurt turning out watery, runny or too sour or yogurt not setting at all! This makes most people turn to the store-bought yogurt which tastes good for sure, but with consequences.

The Additives in Store Bought Yogurt

The store-bought yogurt gets its taste and texture from a number of additives and artificial sugars which may be good to the taste but are a lot less nutritious and even bad for health sometimes. The commonly used additives for thickening are gelatin (glue made from animal bones), pectin (a bio-polymer acid, lab-made ingredient), powdered milk etc. And it is usually loaded with unhealthy sugars and artificial sweeteners that can make things really bad for people who have type 2 diabetes. While real and all-natural yogurt is actually supposed to help with many health issues, this one with the additives does just the opposite.

So, if one wants to take advantage of all the essential nutrients the yogurt can offer, it’s important that it is made at home using the natural method, which is actually quite simple if you know this secret:

The Natural Method of Making Yogurt at Home

The secret to making the thickest and creamy yogurt is making it at home in a pure clay pot! Pure-clay pots are made from the highest quality natural clay (primary clay) that has no contaminants and is made by hands without using ANY additives. These pots are Non-toxic – will make sure nothing leaches into your yogurt and contaminate it, and semi-porous – allow excess water to evaporate making the yogurt thick and creamy, naturally and WITHOUT any additives.

Once you have the pot, the rest is easy:

  1. Heat the milk to just before boiling point (till small bubbles form on the surface). Turn stove off, and open lid and let it cool down for 30 mins or so, till you can put your little finger and hold it there for 5 secs. Now the milk is ready for the culture.
  2. Add yogurt culture.
  3. Set in the oven with the lid on and oven light on.
  4. Let it incubate for 6-8 hours and the yogurt is ready.

The whole process takes less than 10 minutes hands-on time and the yogurt left in the pot gets thicker and creamier within few hours after fermenting. Also, no additives or sugars are needed and there is no nutritional loss (because the heat from the walls of the pot is gentle on the food’s nutritional cells).